Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Julian Santa Ana on Unsplash

If you are serious about getting started on your dream or stepping deeper into your calling, then knowing the kind of resistance you’re experiencing holds the keys you need.

The big takeaway of this list of breakthrough opportunities: Just because your dream isn’t easy doesn’t mean it’s not meant to be. When you identify what resistance is pushing back, you can recognize the best strategy to move forward with ease.

The most important thing to understand with this is that if you keep trying harder you’ll get discouraged.

Naming your resistance helps you spell out the difference between success and failure so don’t quit before making any progress. …


Image for post
Image for post

Tim Grahl describes his first novel, The Threshing as The Matrix meets The Hunger Games. For any fans of either book or movie, that would be incentive enough. However, when I have a precious time and focus available to immerse myself into someone else’s world, sci-fi would not be my first choice.

Yet, I devoured this book in the first 24 hours of my COVID-19 quarantine — and not just because it was a great read.

The Threshing begins with twelve-year-old Jessie breaking into someone’s home to steal credits. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Eddie Kopp on Unsplash

Would you consider yourself a big dreamer or a non-dreamer?

Of course, there are more nuances to people than how we dream about our future. However, how you interact with others each other’s style of ideation and implementation, as well as what they value and how they express it, can have a huge impact on your confidence and progress. Inevitably, dreamers and non-dreamers not only attract each other, they need each other.

I’ve spent the majority of my career years around visionaries, ideators and innovative leaders — big dreamers. Their vision drew me in and their passion energized me. As a non-dreamer, the way they could think up possibilities fascinated me. Yet, when the novelty dissipated, frustration set in. My strength was in putting a plan in motion, and often they weren’t ready for my questions and quandaries. …


11 Family Members, 12 Months and an Impossible Goal

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Jéssica Oliveira on Unsplash

Can you imagine training a family of 11 on a mission to live without grumbling for a year?

That’s what the book The Grumble-Free Year: Twelve Months, Eleven Family Members and One Impossible Goal (2019) is about.

Tricia Goyer, the author, inspired me before I even picked up any of her 80+ books. Anyone who has writes that many published books, adopts two sets of siblings after she’s raised her own children, homeschools to boot, and still finds space in her life to care for a grandparent and help weekly with the local teen pregnancy centre she founded — well, it certainly arrests my attention.

When the book came out on November 5, it intrigued me. I only have one child in kindergarten, and steering our family towards non-whiny, pleasant attitudes can be challenging enough. As the eldest of eight children who were homeschooled, I could only imagine the feat Tricia’s adventure must have been. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by dan carlson on Unsplash

Living in the tension between sharing your heart and message with excellence and knowing when you’ve reached the best for that moment is a daily challenge for perfectionists.

You want people to know you care and that you’ve given your best. You hope people don’t judge or misunderstand you if you have to…

…leave your project or day job on time to be with your family instead of putting in overtime

…say no to someone you don’t want to disappoint

…send that email without proof-reading it for the 5th time

…share your story when you don’t feel prepared enough.

Transforming from perfectionist to recovering perfectionist to authentic, intentional freedom means dancing with that tension daily. The feelings of fear and uncertainty might not go away completely. They haven’t for me. …


Image for post
Image for post

In my post 14 Signs Perfectionism Might Be Sabotaging Your Dream I talked about how proud I was to be a perfectionist — until I realized how much it was getting in the way of what was important to me.

Only when I royally screwed up my own (and God’s) standards did I stand face to face with my imperfection. In one humble moment, filled with shame and regret, I realized how striving for perfection would always keep me from what I truly wanted.

What is your core desire?

The things my heart desired the most were:

:: Inner peace
:: To feel loved and valued
:: To become my best self without worrying about what others thought
:: Relationships where I could be fully me — and where others felt the same
:: Freedom and the adventure of new…


Image for post
Image for post

I’ve been told I was a snotty teenager.

That perception might have had something to do with my reserved nature. Or because I could be usually be found sitting in a corner with a novel rather than interacting with people.

Another reason was my black-and-white, all-or-nothing view. My standards were high. If someone didn’t meet them, they didn’t deserve my attention. Or such was my attitude. I wanted to do things well or I felt there was no point in doing them at all. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Toa Heftiba on Unsplash

“I need to find my purpose. I feel like I’m dying inside!”

Esther’s eyes welled up with tears as she blurted out these words in our first coaching session.

I almost forgot to drink my latte as she described her situation.

She had moved to a new town and was feeling lonely in the long process of meeting people and making new friends.

Adjusting to her new family situation had been more stressful and time-consuming than she realized, so she hadn’t gone job hunting yet. Her work credentials didn’t qualify her to work in the same field so she might have to choose a whole new career. …


When it’s time to be okay with being lost, inefficient and imperfect.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by averie woodard on Unsplash

When I was single and directionally challenged, driving out of the Niagara Region was always a big deal for me. Until marrying the man who fused my addiction to GPS convenience, I relied on paper road maps to get around. A cell phone was a luxury my budget could afford. Each venture to a destination outside my home town felt like a courageous accomplishment. When I drove with others, I felt the pressure to know where I was going and how to get there directly without any second-guessing or turnaround. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Shelby Miller on Unsplash

In the past couple of years, I’ve had a people come to me compelled to share their story.

Some of them weren’t sure why they need to tell it except that the thought won’t go away. Others thought it might help someone but weren’t sure how to go about it. Still others knew it would be part of their healing process.

There’s no denying that revisiting parts of your past or self that you wish didn’t exist can feel painful or embarrassing.

But here are some powerful gifts I’ve experienced through someone’s story:

Vulnerability

There’s risk that comes with sharing your story. Yet with that vulnerability comes a meaningful connection I would have otherwise missed. …

About

Emily Grabatin

I‘m a mom, purpose coach and author of Dare to Decide: Discovering Peace, Clarity and Courage at Life’s Crossroads (July 2020).

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store